Noticias

Burial of the Sardine

Burial of the Sardine

Every year, on Ash Wednesday, the town of Naiguatá celebrates the ‘Burial of the Sardine’, a tradition that simulates the passage of a funeral through the village accompanied by a group of widows confessing their carnal sins and mourning the body of the Sardine. The celebration culminates ‘returning’ the Sardine to the sea. It is an irreverent festivity, marked by the mockery of established rules signaling the end of Carnival.

The ‘Locos’ of El Valle

The ‘Locos’ of El Valle

In the population of El Valle, on the northern part of Mérida city, the celebration of the ‘Virgen de la Candelaria’ takes place every year on February 2nd. Local men dress up and dance in payment of vows during the feast of ‘Los Locos de la Candelaria’. ‘Los Locos’ appear early in the morning and visit numerous households to cherish local mangers, accompanied by the sounds of violin, cuatro, guitar, maracas and güira or charrasca.

Drums for Saint Benedict

The cult of Saint Benedict the Moor spans several regions of Venezuela practiced with greater fervor in the southern states of Lake Maracaibo. Palmarito begins its celebrations on December 27th, ending on January 6th, accompanied Chimbángle drums and ‘Gaita de Tambora’. The procession goes around town and local vicinities for several days and nights. The songs and dances for Saint Benedict are said to be associated with African rites from Togo, Benin, Nigeria, Angola, and Ghana.